James O'Neill's Blog

January 24, 2008

Hyper-V API information on MSDN

Filed under: How to,Powershell,Virtualization,Windows Server,Windows Server 2008 — jamesone111 @ 10:37 am

I’ve been waiting for this for a little while, in fact I had hoped to see a draft before it went public (although I wonder if that actually falls foul of the rules on not having “Secret” APIs). I could see the WMI providers from Powershell but working out what to with them wasn’t trivial.

The information is now published on MSDN at http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc136992(VS.85).aspx

Calling WMI APIs from PowerShell is something I know a bit about having done a lot of that for the OCS resource kit so it looks like I’m going to be having some fun with this … yes I do regard it as fun.

I’ve mentioned Jeff Woolsey before he’s a contributor on the virtualization team blog and keeps us informed internally with clear headings about  what’s confidential, what to share and what can be public with a “please don’t paste to your blog” this one came tagged This is important customer information. Please provide this information to customers.

Here’s a bit more informatiom from Jeff. Please note the final paragraph – the APIs are settled enough to share, but they are not guaranteed to be final.

The virtualization team is pleased to announce the public beta release of the Hyper-V WMI interfaces.

Hyper-V WMI APIs. Hyper-V uses WMI APIs (similar to the Virtual Server COM API) to create, manage, monitor, configure virtual resources. We expect the Hyper-V WMI APIs to be used widely in a variety of ways such as:

· By third party management vendors who want to write tools to manage WSV (examples, HP Openview & IBM Director)

· By enterprises who want to integrate with an existing management solution

· Developers who want to automate virtualization in a test/dev environments through scripts

The Hyper-V WMI APIs are publicly available here:

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc136992(VS.85).aspx

Important: This documentation is preliminary and is subject to change. This same warning is provided online (see the screenshot below). While we’re trying to avoid any changes, modifications are still possible up to the final release. We encourage user feedback by clicking on the link below to “Send comments about this topic to Microsoft.”

 

This post originally appeared on my technet blog.

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